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Mathematical paradoxes

A paradox is a proposition that, despite appearing to be coherent reasoning, demonstrates a lack of nexus or logic, hiding contradictions arising from an incorrect analysis of its internal structure. Here are some paradoxes related to mathematics. Holes in God's Omnipotence Cheese Sandwich or Happiness?
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The quality of life game II

So, of course, a fundamental question arises: Where do these inevitable costs come from? Who, or what, imposes such costs on us? The Quality of Life Game I It is necessary to clarify the question of how the individual elaborates his survival strategies. Recall that the individual quality of life (JQVI) game is not a real-life description of anyone, but the theorized virtual scenario that the individual's brain could create by recognizing itself by playing its JQVI.
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Girolamo Cardano

Girolamo Cardano was born on September 24, 1501 in Pavia, Italy. He died on September 21, 1576 in Rome. Cardano was an Italian physicist and mathematician who devoted himself to mathematics, physics, astronomy, philosophy, medicine and astrology. In mathematics, his masterpiece is the book Artis Magnae Sive by Regulis Algebraicis (The Great Art or the Rules of Algebra), published in 1545, where are: - the method of solving the degree 3 equations, obtained from his friend Tartaglia (1499 - 1557), and grade 4, obtained from his disciple Lovic Ferrari (1522 - 1565); - the rule: "less times less gives more".
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Grandfather's Paradox

The paradox happens when a person travels to the past and kills his grandfather before he meets his wife, who is his grandmother. In this way the existence of this person becomes impossible. Some argue that the continuation cannot be changed. Therefore, as you travel into the past and kill your ancestor, a parallel universe would emerge.
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Challenge Response 95

Mother, daughters and apples We must solve this problem backwards. When giving the third daughter, the apples are gone. Therefore, at that moment the mother only had 1 apple, ie: half of the apples (0.5) + half apple (0.5) = 1 apple Before giving the second daughter: (1 + 0.5) * 2 = 3 apples in the basket Before giving the first daughter: (3 + 0,5) * 2 = 7 apples in the basket Answer: The basket contained 7 apples.
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Hippark

Hiparchus, in Greek Hipparkhos, century astronomer and mathematician. II BC, was born in Nicaea, Bithynia. He lived in Alexandria, but worked mainly in Rhodes, from 161 to 126 BC. D staked by the method and rigor of his observations. He created technically perfected instruments that allowed him to draw up a catalog of approximately eighty stars.
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