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Challenge 127

The Night Guard's Resignation Difficulty Level: A great businessman, needing to go to Sao Paulo, came to his night guard and ordered him to wake him at 6 am sharp. At exactly 6 am, the guard woke up the businessman and said: "Boss, I have a bad feeling.
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The mathematique

The numbers, my joy With so much affection I fill my heart; Here in the form of poetry To Mathematics, my gratitude. Keeping in mind two ideologies: Mathematics and Portuguese; By merging these disciplines, Mathematists enter the scene. Even though they are distinct, they have a great connection; Like a mix of inks Coloring Education.
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The man who memorized over 100,000 decimal places in Pi

Japanese engineer Akira Haraguchi, born in 1946, is known for memorizing and reciting digits of the Pi () number. He sees the memorization of the Pi number as "the religion of the universe" and as an expression of his lifelong pursuit of eternal truth. It reached the 100,000-digit world record after 16 hours of recitation, starting at 9am on October 3, 2006 and ending at 1:28 am the next day.
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Challenge 99 Response

Pancho Villa's Trip We have three numbers, one in each milestone: xy yx x0y We can see that x must be less than y, because the distance in the second milestone must be greater than the distance from the first. We can also conclude that x = 1, since the distance between each landmark is a 2-digit number, and the sum of two 2-digit numbers will never result in a value greater than 198.
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Directly proportional quantities

A furnace has its cast iron output according to the table below: Time (minutes) Production (Kg) 5 100 10 200 15 300 20 400 Note that one quantity varies with the other. These quantities are dependent variables. Note that: When we double the time, production also doubles. 5 min -> 100Kg 10 min -> 200Kg When we triple the time, production also triples.
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Graph of a first degree equation with two variables

We know that a two-variable first degree equation has infinite solutions. Each of these solutions can be represented by an ordered pair (x, y). Having two ordered pairs of an equation, we can graph them on a Cartesian plane, determining, through the line that joins them, the set of solutions of this equation.
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