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Winning love with math
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Winning love with math

I made an exact calculation to win my love With the circumference of a ray of emotion I calculated its edges with the life span of my heart Discovered my love in mathematics In one operation I added your virtue Soon diminishes your defects I multiplied your personality I made an accurate count nothing left Your low verticality was equated With horizontality in the nest of our love When we started I used arithmetic With the key of time we made a set The sum of our feelings was universe And the passion came strong in geometric progression I shared with you your sadness, joys and Emotions I filled your body in round shapes To fit my heart.

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Kurt Hensel

Kurt Hensel was born on December 29, 1861 in Königsberg, Prussia (today Kaliningrad, Russia), and died on June 1, 1941 in Marburg, Germany. He invented the p-adic numbers, an algebraic theory that has proved important in more recent applications. Hensel studied mathematics in Berlin and Bonn.
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Jean Victor Poncelet

Jean Victor Poncelet was born in Metz in the year 1788. Having excelled as a student while attending Metz Polytechnic School, Poncelet became known as an excellent mathematics teacher and was invited to serve as an engineer in the Napoleonic army. In 1812 Poncelet fought the French forces in Russia, falling prisoner. During the eighteen months of captivity, he began writing one of his most notable works: Projective Geometry, the theory in which Desargues and Pascal had taken their first steps in the century. XVII.
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Giuseppe Peano

Peano was born on August 27, 1858 in Cuneo, Piemont, Italy, and died on April 20, 1932 in Turin, Italy. He was the founder of symbolic logic and the center of his interests was the foundations of mathematics and the development of a formal logical language. Peano studied mathematics at the University of Turin and joined staff there in 1880, being assigned to a chair in 1890.
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Henri Poincaré

The Frenchman Jules Henri Poincaré was born on April 29, 1854 and died on July 17, 1912. He was a famous mathematician, physicist and philosopher of science, being described as the last "universalist" capable of understanding and contributing in all fields of life. Mathematical discipline. He was born in Nancy, France, the son of an influential family in society at the time.
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Edmond halley

Although there are hundreds of comets observed throughout the ages, Halley's comet is the most talked about, it crosses the history of mankind, it is like a trace of unity, associating us with all our ancestors who contemplated it with all our descendants. who beheld him. But who is the character whose name is attached to him?
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Simon Stevin

Simon Stevin was a Flemish mathematician who was born in 1548 and died in 1620. It was as a tax collector that Simon Stevin began his professional career, but later chose to join Leiden University. It can be said that the study of hydrostatics began with Stevin. It was he who demonstrated that the pressure a liquid exerts on a surface depends only on the column height of the liquid and the surface area, regardless of the size or shape of the container.
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John Venn

John Venn was born on August 4, 1834 in Hull, England, and died on April 4, 1923 in Cambridge, England. He came from an Evangelical background church and when he entered Gonville and the Caius Cambridge College in 1853 he had a slight contact with books of any kind and it can be said that there had begun his knowledge of literature.
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The incredible repetition of number 6174

Choose a 4-digit number (except 1111, 2222, etc.) and do the following: 1) Put your digits in ascending order 2) Put your digits in descending order 3) Subtract the smaller number from the larger number Repeat the steps 1, 2 and 3 to the result, and so on. What happens?
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James Joseph Sylvester

James Joseph Sylvester was born on September 3, 1814 in London, England. He died on March 15, 1897 also in London. English mathematician, was the first to use the term matrix to indicate a rectangular table of numbers. He was a friend of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley (1821 + 74 = 1895), with whom he developed Mathematical Algebra.
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Grigori perelman

Grigori Yakovlevich Perelman, Russian mathematician, was born on June 13, 1966 in Leningrad, Soviet Union (today Saint Petersburg, Russia), son of Jewish parents. He is known to have presented, in late 2003, a demonstration of the Poincaré conjecture (a particular case of the Thurston Geometrization conjecture), which was one of the most famous problems in mathematics.
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John Von Neumann

John Von Neumann was a Hungarian mathematician of Jewish origin who was a naturalized American in the 1930s. Born December 28, 1903. Developed major contributions in Quantum Mechanics, Set Theory, Computer Science, Economics, Game Theory, and virtually every area of ​​Mathematics.
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What are cyclic numbers?

Cyclic numbers are those that multiplied by another number less than or equal to the number of digits that it has, their numbers will be repeated cyclically, passing to the end those in front. For example: The first cyclic number is 142857. If this number (which has six digits) is multiplied by the numbers from 1 to 6 we get: 2 x 142857 = 285714 (note that 1 and 4 were passed to the end) 3 x 142857 = 428571 (1 goes to the end ) 4 x 142857 = 571428 5 x 142857 = 714285 6 x 142857 = 857142 If we multiply by 7 what we get is 999999.
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What does the number Pi represent?

The number Pi represents the value of the ratio between the circumference of any circle and its diameter. It is the oldest known mathematical constant. It is an irrational number, with infinite decimal places and not periodic. What are cyclic numbers? Index Next >> What are Mersenne Numbers?
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Poincaré Conjecture

Formulated at the beginning of the twentieth century by the French mathematician Henri Poincaré, the Poincaré conjecture is one of the most famous problems of mathematics. She states that the three-dimensional surface of a sphere is the only enclosed 3-dimensional space where all contours or paths can be shrunk to a single point.
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Curiosities with triangular numbers

If a triangular number is multiplied by 8 and plus 1, the result is a square number. See: 1.8 + 1 = 9 3.8 + 1 = 25 This statement was made by Plutarch around AD 100. Perfect Squares and Their Roots Index Next >> How Much is a Million Worth?
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The curious spiral of prime numbers

The prime number spiral, also known as the Ulam spiral, is a graphical representation in which positive integers are arranged in a spiral shape, with prime numbers being somehow indicated along this spiral. It was discovered by mathematician Stanislaw Ulam in 1963 while scribbling on paper because he was bored during a scientific meeting.
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The number five in life

There are several collections that total five elements. Here are some examples: Cinco, the toes Cinco, the toes Cinco, the world titles of the Brazilian football team Cinco, the petals of a rose Cinco, are the senses Cinco, the vowels Cinco, the tips of a star Cinco , the rivers of Hell Five, the noble orders of architecture Five, the commandments of Buddha Five, the famous captains of history Five, the lines of the musical staff Five, the great geological ages Five, the regular convex polyhedra Number three and the proverbs Index Next >> Body Surface Area
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The numbers gugol and gugolplex

Gugol is number 1 followed by 100 zeros. This name came about when, on one occasion, American mathematician Edward Kasner asked his 9-year-old nephew Milton Sirotta what number there was. The boy's response (something like guuugol) was not very encouraging, but in Kasner's mind it was a nice joke.
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The man who memorized over 100,000 decimal places in Pi

Japanese engineer Akira Haraguchi, born in 1946, is known for memorizing and reciting digits of the Pi () number. He sees the memorization of the Pi number as "the religion of the universe" and as an expression of his lifelong pursuit of eternal truth. It reached the 100,000-digit world record after 16 hours of recitation, starting at 9am on October 3, 2006 and ending at 1:28 am the next day.
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English units of measure

Also called the imperial measure, the English unit is the name given to several units of measurement used in the United Kingdom until 1824. This year, the Weights and Measures Act standardized this system, keeping most drive names but changing some of their settings.
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