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Unusual to others
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Unusual to others

You're such a rare gene, With an emotional function, It makes me spend hours researching Some relationship between you, any sign. Different and delicate, Innocent and pure, I want to be able to decipher your secrets, My number, mysterious and dark. The ink of the pen is already gone, The rain will pass, And I'm still here Between papers, trying to code you.

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Pierre Simon Laplace

The famous French mathematician Jean d'Alembert gave no thought to the eighteen-year-old looking for him. The boy had sent several letters of recommendation from scientists and politicians, and that was enough to make d'Alembert angry. But he lacked the stubbornness of Pierre Simon Laplace, who soon wrote a short treatise on the general principles of mathematics and sent it to the teacher.
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Marquis of Condorcet

Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat, French thinker, mathematician, teacher, encyclopedist and revolutionary politician. Typical representative of the 18th century Enlightenment ideals is considered the founder of the French educational system. Condorcet's ideas for economic freedom, religious tolerance, legal and educational reforms, and against slavery make him a typical Enlightenment figure, even if it belongs to the nobility.
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Omar Khayyám

Hakim Omar Khayyám was born in Naishápúr (Nishapur), a city in northeastern Persia, Khorassán, in the second half of the 11th century, on May 18, 1048, and died on December 4, 1131. During his life he became famous for his contributions to mathematics and astronomy, a reputation that probably served to eclipse his talent for poetry.
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Blaise pascal

Blaise Pascal was a French philosopher and mathematician, born in Clermont in 1623 and died in 1662 in the city of Paris. He was the son of Etienne Pascal, also a Mathematician. In 1632, the whole family went to live in Paris. Pascal's father, who had an unorthodox educational background, decided that he would teach his children himself and that Pascal would not study mathematics until he was 15, so he had all mathematical books and texts removed from home.
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Plato

Plato was a Greek philosopher (427 BC? - 347 BC?), One of the most important of all time. His theories, called Platonism, focus on the distinction of two worlds: the visible, sensible or world of reflexes, and the invisible, intelligible or world of ideas. Socrates' disciple, develops the theory of method (or dialectic) and the theory of reminiscence, according to which man lives in the world of ideas before his incarnation and contemplates them in their pure state.
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Brooklyn taylor

Brook Taylor was born August 18, 1685 in Edmonton, Middlesex, England, and died December 29, 1731 in London, England. He added mathematics to a new branch now called the "calculus of finite differences," invented piecewise integration, and discovered the famous formula known as Taylor's expansion, of which importance remained unrecognized until 1772, when Lagrange proclaimed this as the basic principle of differential calculus.
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Ranganathan

Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan was an Indian mathematician and librarian, born August 9, 1892, in the rural village of Shiyali. His main contribution to the field of library science is the development of the first analytical-synthetic classification system, the colon classification.
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Olga Oleinik

Olga Arsen'evna Oleinik was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1925, and died in Moscow in 2001. She grew up in very difficult years in Russia, but despite the difficulties, she graduated in Mathematics at Moscow University in 1947. where he continued his training. He obtained his Master's degree in 1950 and his doctorate in 1954 at the Institute of Mathematics at Moscow University.
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Paolo Ruffini

Paolo Ruffini, physician and mathematician, was born in Valentano, Papal States (now Italy) on September 22, 1765, and died on May 10, 1822 in Modena (now Italy). At first, he intended to enter Holy Orders and went far, until he received the tonsure (ceremony that gave him the first degree of Order in the clergy).
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Nicolo Fontana (Tartaglia)

Nicolo Fontana was born in 1499 in Brescia, Italy, and died on December 13, 1557 in Venice, also in Italy. His nickname, Tartaglia (which means "stutterer"), has a curious story, which he himself tells in his book "Quesiti et inventioni diverse". In 1512, when Brescia was sacked by French troops commanded by Gaston de Foix, Nicolo took refuge with his mother and sister in the town's church, believing it to be a safe place.
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What are triangular numbers?

The first triangular numbers are 1, 3, and 6. See why: Triangular numbers can be calculated using two formulas: iterative and recursive: Iterative formula T (n) = 1 + 2 + 3 +… + n Recursive formula T (1) = 1 T (n + 1) = T (n) + (n + 1) A curiosity with three-digit numbers Index Next >> What are cyclic numbers?
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The curious prime number 193,939

The number 193,939 is really a remarkable prime number. Its reverse (939,391) is also a prime number. In fact, all the various transformations of this number are prime numbers. See: 193,939 939,391 393,919 939,193 391,939 919,393 Throwing a coin 26 times Table of Contents Next >> What is a Enupla?
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Goldbach conjecture

In mathematics, a conjecture is a proposition that many mathematicians believe to be true, based on assumptions, evidence, forebodings, hypotheses, but have not yet proved it. Goldbach's famous conjecture is one of the oldest unresolved problems in mathematics. It was proposed on June 7, 1742 by Prussian mathematician Christian Goldbach, in a letter written to Leonhard Euler.
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What are regular numbers?

A number is said to be regular if its prime factor decomposition has only powers of 2, 3, and 5. Example: 60 is a regular number, because 60 = 2².3.5. Squares of Integers Index Next >> Square of Sum of Natural Numbers
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What are transcending numbers?

These are the numbers that are not algebraic. There is no integer coefficient polynomial from which they are root. The number Pi, for example, is a transcendent number because it cannot be obtained as the root of any integer coefficient polynomial. Transcendent numbers are infinite and there is much more than algebraic numbers (which are those that can be obtained as the root of an integer coefficient polynomial).
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Two very interesting sums

Note these two sums: 88 2 + 33 2 = 8833 12 2 + 33 2 = 1233 Square numbers can be defined as all those that result from multiplying an integer by itself once. They have caught the attention of mathematicians for several centuries, generating numerous problems that are difficult to solve.
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Number Three and the Sayings

There are several proverbs that involve the number three. Examples: "Three times in jail is a sign of the gallows." "Who goes to the party three days is no good." "Three things change the man: Wine, study and woman." "Secret of three the devil made." "Three brothers, three fortresses." "Company of three is bad." "Secret of two, secret of God; secret of three, the devil did.
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The number 12345679

If we multiply the number 12345679 by any multiple of 9, between 9 and 81, we get a product whose repeating digit is the multiplier itself divided by 9. 12345679 x 9 = 111.111.111 (9/9 = 1) 12345679 x 18 = 222,222,222 (18/9 = 2) 12345679 x 27 = 333,333,333 (27/9 = 3) 12345679 x 36 = 444.
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Decoding the message

Read and decode the message below: 4S V3235 3U 4C0RD0 M310 M473M471C0. D31X0 70D4 4 4857R4C40 N47UR4L D3 L4D0 3 M3 P0NH0 4 P3N54R 3M NUM3R05, C0M0 53 F0553 UM4 P35504 R4C10N4L. 540 5373 D1550, N0V3 D4QU1L0… QU1N23 PR45 0NZ3… 7R323N705 6R4M45 D3 PR35UNT0… M45 L060 C410 N4 R34L 3 C0M3Ç0 4 F423R V3R505 H1NDU-4R481C05 Words that come from the next four words Table of contents >>
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Sequential time

Considering May 4th, 2006, at 2 minutes and 3 seconds past 1 am, we have the following sequential time: 01:02:03 04/05/06 It is a numerical sequence that will never be repeated. Square Root of Sequential Numbers Table of Contents Next >> The Origin of the Degree
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